Missing deflation – unique to America?

By Paul Hubert, Mathilde Le Moigne

Was the way inflation unfolded after the 2007-2009 crisis atypical? According to Paul Krugman: “If inflation [note: in the United States] had responded to the Great Recession and aftermath in the same way it did in previous big slumps, we would be deep in deflation by now; we aren’t.” Indeed, after 2009, inflation in the United States remained surprisingly stable given actual economic developments. Has this phenomenon, which has been described as “missing deflation”, been observed in the euro zone? Continue reading “Missing deflation – unique to America?”

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La désinflation manquante est-elle un phénomène américain uniquement ?

par Paul Hubert, Mathilde Le Moigne

La dynamique de l’inflation après la crise de 2007-2009 est-elle atypique ? Selon Paul Krugman : « si la réaction de l’inflation (ndlr : aux Etats-Unis) avait été la même à la suite de la Grande Récession que lors des précédentes crises économiques, nous aurions dû nous trouver aujourd’hui en pleine déflation… Nous ne le sommes pas. » En effet, après 2009, l’inflation aux Etats-Unis est demeurée étonnamment stable au regard de l’évolution de l’activité réelle. Ce phénomène a été qualifié de « désinflation manquante ». Un tel phénomène s’observe-t-il dans la zone euro ? Continue reading “La désinflation manquante est-elle un phénomène américain uniquement ?”

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Is missing disinflation a uniquely American phenomenon?

By Paul Hubert, Mathilde Le Moigne

Are the dynamics of inflation after the 2007-2009 crisis atypical? According to Paul Krugman, “If inflation had responded to the Great Recession and aftermath the way it did in previous big slumps, we would be deep in deflation by now; we aren’t.” In fact, after 2009, inflation in the US has remained surprisingly stable in terms of changes in real activity. This phenomenon has been called “missing disinflation”. Can a phenomenon like this be seen in the euro zone? Continue reading “Is missing disinflation a uniquely American phenomenon?”

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Wage moderation in Germany – at the origin of France’s economic difficulties

By Xavier Ragot, President of the OFCE, CNRS-PSE, together with Mathilde Le Moigne, ENS

If the future of the euro zone does indeed depend on political cooperation between France and Germany, then economic divergences between the two countries should be a cause for concern. These divergences need to be analysed, with particular attention to three specific areas: the unemployment rate, the trade balance and the public debt. Germany’s unemployment rate is falling steadily; in June it was under the 5% mark, which represents almost full employment, whereas the French rate is over 10%. Germany’s low unemployment rate does not however reflect strong consumption by German households, but rather the country’s export capacity. While France continues to run a negative trade balance (importing more than it exports), Germany is now the world’s leading exporter, ahead of China, with a trade surplus that will run close to 8% in 2015. As for the public deficit, it will be around 3.8% in France in 2015, while Germany is now generating a surplus. This has impressive consequences for the way the public debt is changing in the two countries. In 2010 they were similar, at around 80% of GDP, but in 2014 Germany’s public debt fell below 75%, and is continuing to decline, while France’s debt has continued to grow, and has now hit 97%. This kind of gap is unprecedented in recent times, and is fraught with mounting tension over the conduct of monetary policy. Continue reading “Wage moderation in Germany – at the origin of France’s economic difficulties”

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